Posts Tagged ‘downpour’

NASA’s “Earth Science Enterprise” maps

2009/08/08

I have stumbled upon a treasure trove of data about weather.  Not only NASA, but many universities have maps of atmospheric vapor.  This shows us the progression of a storm. The films I have seen so far show very clear rhythms  of expansion and spin in the middle latitudes, so correlation with the Moon is just a matter of determining the best images and dating with the correct biodynamic calendar.

We have lots of work to do to make that higher level graphic correlation, but in the meantime, yesterday was oppressive, humid and cloudy, but shifting from the Earth/Root Constellation into the Flower/Air Constellation brought clear skies and a fresh breeze.  So the fundamental sequence of changes in the weather that coincide with the cusps clearly continues.

For the record, the previous cusp into the Fire/Fruit Constellation brought some hours of heavy rains, followed by hot clear skies.  That would be pretty on the rain maps we will be finding and decoding  – but probably in September or so . . .

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First Rains of Autumn

2009/04/08

We have not had any rain since the equinox, when I started this blog!  So yesterday, in the Fruit/Fire Constellation, we did have significant rain, ending a along dry spell which allowed the grapes and tomatoes to ripen well.  The rain was accompanied by stiff winds and the style of the rain was in downpours, with thick Cumulonimbus cloud cover all day.

The hours before a storm are known for high ionization of the air, and a sense of activity has moved me to get outside and moving.  Yesterday we took a short hike up to 330 meters from our seaside town.  We were just at the base of the clounds, so were delighted to get a view of distant shores in between gusts.  Luckily we were almost down as the first of a long series of downpours blew in. 

The rain and wind are much easier to report when compared to cloud types.  The surprise in this report is that the rain arrived in a Fruit/Fire Constellation, which we had not had.  This began a series of new aspects of this research!